FAQs

HEALTH STREET FAQS

We’ve answered some of your most frequently asked questions about CPR and first aid. Still have questions? With over a decade of experience in emergency and pre-hospital care, our CPROLOGISTS® are here to help!

Contact us to learn more about CPR and first aid, and how to get started with your training today.

How do I claim my AHA eCard?
  • You will receive an email from ecards@heart.org with a link inviting you to claim your eCard online. If you did not receive the email, then please contact us at 281-920-9490.
  • The link within the email will direct you to the student profile webpage where you will be asked to set up your own security questions and answers.
  • You will then be directed to fill out a brief survey.
  • Upon completion of the survey, you will be able to view, print or email the card
  • You can always access the card by visiting cpr.heart.org
My name was misspelled on the AHA eCard ?
If you have taken the class with us, then please contact our office @ 281-920-9490 and we will correct it.
I claimed my AHA eCard but I cannot find it?
Your AHA eCard is available for you to access at any time by visiting cpr.heart.org. click on “Course Cards” and then on “View Your eCard Profile”
How do I access the ACLS Pre-test?
How do I access the PALS Pre-Test?
1)Visit http://heart.org/eccstudent
2)Enter the following code: pals15
WHY LEARN CPR?
Approximately 400,000 people die from sudden cardiac arrest each year in the US. About 80% of cardiac arrest happens at home. Performing early CPR increases the victim’s chance of survival by 40%. Every minute that passes by without doing chest compressions, the person’s chance of survival goes down 20% each minute. Learning CPR can help you save a life!
WHO NEEDS CPR?
If a person suddenly becomes unresponsive and collapses, it is likely a cardiac arrest. When this happens, check the person for signs of breathing and attempt to feel for a carotid pulse for no more than 10 seconds. If the person is not responding and not breathing, you must call 911 or ask someone to call 911 and bring you an AED, then immediately begin chest compression. You can perform Hands-Only CPR.
WHAT IS HANDS-ONLY CPR?
Hands-Only CPR is CPR without mouth-to-mouth breaths. It is recommended for use by people who see a teen or adult suddenly collapse in an “out-of-hospital” setting (such as at home, at work, or in a park). It consists of two easy steps: 1. Call 9-1-1 (or send someone to do that). 2. Push hard and fast in the center of the chest.
WHAT IS AN AED AND HOW CAN I USE IT?
AED is short for an Automated External Defibrillator. When the heart stops functioning the way it needs to, an AED can help restart it. Almost like a jump start for your car battery. This is a device is used while providing high quality CPR and assist in increase of survival for a person. Once an AED becomes available you are to turn it on. The AED will be able to prompt you with further instructions.
WHAT IF YOU ARE NOT CERTIFIED? WILL I GET IN ANY LEGAL TROUBLE IF I PERFORM CPR?
The Good Samaritan law protects bystanders when you choose to help someone in need of an emergency. CPR certified or not, Hands-Only-CPR or what you were taught in your course falls under this law.
IF I PERFORM CPR ON A PERSON WHO HAS A PULSE, WILL I HARM THEM?
Studies have shown there is a very slim to no chance of harming someone who has a pulse and you initiate CPR compression. In theory, better safe to assist someone who may not need help than be sorry and not assist someone who does.
WHAT IS A HEART ATTACK?
For our heart muscles to function appropriately, it needs oxygen to survive. A heart attack, also called myocardial infarction (MI), happens when the blood flowing through the coronary arteries is deprived due to built up fat, cholesterol and other substances collected (plaque) forming a blood clot cutting off the blood flow oxygen supply to the heart muscles. The heart muscles at this point are starved of oxygen and nutrients causing damage to part of the heart muscles. Nutrients causing damage to part of the heart muscles.
WARNING SIGNS FOR HEART ATTACK?
1. Shortness of breath (not always seen) with or even without chest discomfort. 2. Tightness, pressure, pain or discomfort in the center of the chest behind the breastbone and sometimes traveling to one, or both arms, back, neck jaw or upper stomach. Note: sometimes the upper stomach pain may be confused for indigestion. 3. Cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness
HOW TO HELP SOMEONE WHO IS HAVING A SUSPECTED HEART ATTACK?
You can do so much for a person who is having a suspected heart attack. Once noticing the sign and symptoms, you should immediately call 911 and answer all the questions. Most of the time 911 will be able to provide you with some instructions while the emergency medical services is on their way. If the person is alert and talking to you, 911 may ask you to assist the person with 2 to 4 chewable baby aspirin, or one extra strength tablet. Be sure to ask the person if they are allergic or have had any other medical conditions that may interfere with the aspirin. Be sure the person stops any activities and have them relax in a position of their comfort. If the person is unconscious be sure the person is laid flat on their back. Staying with the person while trained professionals arrive and look for breathing and pulses. If you note the person is unconscious and not breathing, you will need to perform CPR.
WHAT IS A STROKE?
Cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) or strokes, is a serious medical condition where the blood vessels supplying blood to the areas of the brain become blocked resulting in ischemia. If this blockage persists, tissues blocked off will begin to die resulting in a stroke.
WARNING SIGNS OF A STROKE?
Follow this F.A.S.T Algorithm:
Facial Drooping
Arm Weakness or drift
Speech Difficulty
Time (time these signs were first noticed)
HOW TO HELP SOMEONE WHO IS HAVING A SUSPECTED STROKE?
Call 911 immediately and stay with the patient until emergency service providers arrive.
Monitor the patient breathing and pulse and begin CPR if needed.
Monitor the patient for vomiting or headache and keep the patient airway open.